Episode 15 – Japanese Canadians in Japan

In this super-size episode, Raymond and Carolyn discuss various experiences of Japanese Canadians in Japan, from the kika-nisei, to the war years and the difficult experience of deportees after the war, to their own stories of living there as Canadians.

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Episode 14 – Aiko Saita

Raymond and Carolyn share the story of Aiko Saita, an international music star and Cumberland-born Nisei. Saita’s studies in Italy were funded by the Japanese Canadian community, who formed the “Saita Aiko Kouenkai” (Aiko Saita support group) to pay for her world-class training. Although she passed away in Japan in 1954, Aiko Saita maintained a deep connection with the Japanese Canadian community: her third North American tour was cut short by the illness which took her life. Even today, many Nisei still remember going to hear her sing.

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Episode 13 – Franchise

In light of the recent federal election, Raymond and Museum Intern Carolyn Nakagawa discuss Japanese Canadians’ long fight for the right to vote, from the British Columbia government’s ban against Japanese Canadians being added to the voters’ list in 1885, to the lifting of all restrictions on citizenship rights for Canadians of Japanese descent in 1949.

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Episode 12 – Magic Hour

Raymond, Scott, and special guest Momoko Ito took some time this past spring to tour the museum’s Magic Hour exhibit, admiring the treasures of the collection quirkily curated by the Instant Coffee collective and sharing background stories on some of the items. Now, their conversation is an archive of this unique exhibit.

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Four delegates on the steps in Ottawa in 1936. Samuel I Hayakawa, Minoru Kobayashi, Hide (Hyodo) Shimizu, Edward Banno.

Episode 10 – Hide Hyodo Shimizu

At 18 years of age, Hide Hyodo Shimizu was the first Japanese Canadian teacher to teach in British Columbia’s public school system. She was part of the delegation sent to Ottawa in 1936 to campaign for voting rights for Japanese Canadians, along with Samuel Hayakawa, Edward Banno and Minoru Kobayashi. She was responsible for organizing schools in the internment camps in British Columbia and later moved to Ontario to attend art college.

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Episode 9 – Registration Cards

In March, 1941, the RCMP, under the orders of Prime Minister King, began registering Japanese and Japanese Canadians.  Afterwards all people above the age of sixteen carried registration cards with them at all times.  But wait this was nine months before Pearl Harbour?!  Join Raymond and Alexis as they talk about the what, why and how of registration cards.

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Episode 7 – Prisoner of War Camps

A day after Pearl Harbour, a large handful of Japanese Nationals were rounded up and shipped to Prisoner of War Camps in Canada.  Later they were joined by Japanese Canadians.  Over the course of the war, around 800 issei and nisei were sent to POW camps.  In this episode, Raymond and Alexis look at the camps and the men who were put inside them.

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